Shakespeare Plays Available in Video Format
Scholars Online Educational Resources

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All’s Well That Ends Well
Antony and Cleopatra
As You Like It
The Comedy of Errors
Coriolanus
Cymbeline
Hamlet
Henry IV, part 1
Henry IV, part 2
Henry V
Henry VI, part 1
Henry VI, part 2
Henry VI, part 3
Henry VIII
Julius Caesar
King John
King Lear
Love’s Labour’s Lost
Macbeth
Measure for Measure
The Merchant of Venice
The Merry Wives of Windsor
A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Much Ado About Nothing
Othello
Pericles
Richard II
Richard III
Romeo and Juliet
The Taming of the Shrew
The Tempest
Timon of Athens
Titus Andronicus
Troilus and Cressida
Twelfth Night
Two Gentlemen of Verona
The Winter’s Tale
Shakespeareana

Available versions

1948: Orson Welles

1954: George Schaefer

1961: Paul Almond

1971: Roman Polanski

1979: Philip Casson

1981: Arthur Allan Seidelman

1983: Jack Gold

1997: Jeremy Freeston

1998: Michael Bogdanov

2001: Gregory Doran

2006: Geoffrey Wright

2009: Colleen Stovall

2010: Rupert Goold

2014: Eve Best


Adaptations

1957: Throne of Blood

1991: Men of Respect

1991: Scotland, PA

1992: Nikolai Serebryakov, Dave Edwards (animated)

1999: Macbeth in Manhattan

2005: ShakespeaRe-Told: Macbeth


Production drama

2003: Slings and Arrows (Season 2)


Educational

2008: This Is Macbeth

2013: Shakespeare Uncovered (Season 1, Ep. 2)


Macbeth
1983: Jack Gold

I’m generally a big supporter of the BBC Shakespeare Plays series: despite the relatively low cinematic production values, they often contain some of the best actors doing some of their best work. This one, however, just doesn’t fly. I was all the more disappointed about that, since I’d seen (and liked) Williamson as Macbeth in Stratford with the RSC in 1974. I’m not sure whether it was the production or the performances that impressed me most, but I was somewhat awed by the whole thing, and I still think there were visionary moments.

This film adaptation, however, features Williamson gasping out his lines in an oddly hyperventilated way; he eventually becomes a parody of himself. I can only assume that this is an artifact of Gold’s direction, since Williamson doesn’t always act that way.


Angus: David Lyon

Banquo: Ian Hogg

Caithness: Peter Porteous

Captain: Christopher Ellison

Doctor: John Woodnutt

Donalbain: Tom Bowles

Duncan: Mark Dignam

First Messenger: Gordon Kane

First Murderer: Barry Lowe

First Witch: Brenda Bruce

Fleance: Alistair Henderson

Gentlewoman: Denyse Alexander

Lady Macbeth: Jane Lapotaire

Lady Macduff: Jill Baker

Lennox: John Rowe

Macbeth: Nicol Williamson

Macduff: Tony Doyle

Malcolm: James Hazeldine

Menteith: Matthew Long

Murderer: Mark Lindsay Chapman

Murderer: Philip Dunbar

Murderer: Rodney Cardiff

Old Man: Will Leighton

Old Siward: William Abney

Porter: James Bolam

Ross: Gawn Grainger

Second Messenger: Christopher Fulford

Second Murderer: Christopher Reich

Second Witch: Eileen Way

Seyton: Eamon Boland

Son to Macduff: Crispin Mair

Third Witch: Anne Dyson

Young Siward: Nicholas Coppin