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Classical Christian Education for the College-Bound

♢ Winner of Seven 2017 Practical HomeSchooling Awards for Excellence in Homeschooling ♢
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First Place
Online Academies
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Scholars Online employs a unique approach to Classical Christian education, rooted in a respectful community of people holding a wide range of beliefs. We have been offering exceptionally rigorous academic content to students for over a decade. Examine our curricula in any area, and you'll see why our students are academically competitive on the national and international stage. Our no-shortcuts approach provides an honest, robust path to the process of living the life of the mind in Christ.

What parents and students say about their Scholars Online courses


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Second Place
High School Core
Latin
Science

Course Spotlight: Natural Science

Developed in the late 1990s for junior high school students and constantly updated, the two-year Natural Science course covers the basics of the modern theories of physical science, life science, and earth sciences in their historical context, helping students gain an appreciation for science as not merely a collection of observations of nature, but a fundamental human activity. Dr. Christe McMenomy brings her love of history, her love of science, and especially her love of the history of astronomy to her subject, inspiring even students who "hate science" to engage with scientific theory and its development. The course relies on primary source materials and a variety of interactive websites to introduce students the people behind the theories, allow them to explore the implications of each theory, and help them determine the reasons some theories were accepted by scientists and society, while others were rejected. Each unit includes an historical perspective, key scientific concepts, and a hands-on lab to help students not only understand but apply the scientific principles they learn and gain the skills needed to pursue honors and AP sciences at the high school level.

Enroll below!


Customize your middle school or high school curriculum from our complete curriculum, or supplement your own homeschool program with individual courses

Full year courses range from $300-$600 per year, and live chat sessions meet one to three times each week so that teachers can provide timely feedback and individual attention to each student. Adults are welcome, too!

2017-2018 Academic Year Courses

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Latin Courses for 2017-2018

Latin I

Latin I and Latin II together provide the elements of the language in a disciplined context, with an emphasis on mastery of inflections and syntactical constructions, Latin I covers the first twenty chapters of Frederic Wheelock's Wheelock's Latin Grammar.

Latin II: (Intermediate Level) Readings in Greek History and Literature

Latin II continues the elementary course begun in Latin I, covering the last twenty chapters of Wheelock's Latin Grammar. By the end of the course, students have encountered representative passages of a variety of prose and poetry, and are prepared to continue with a wide range of material.

Latin III

Latin III will offer a regular course of readings from the text anthology focusing primarily on Republican Rome, regular reading in the history texts, and vocabulary and grammar quizzing and review. A student should normally expect to spend an hour to an hour and a half outside class each day in preparation: half an hour to an hour of translation, fifteen minutes of vocabulary drill, and fifteen minutes of reading in the historical material. The amount of time required will vary with the student's flexibility with translating.


Latin IV (Preparation for the AP Exam)

This course follows the College Board's AP 2012 revised curriculum for Latin (Caesar and Vergil). It cannot be called AP Latin, since I am not seeking official approval from the College Board, but our students routinely go on to take the exam and to do well in it. Students read all assigned passages from the De Bello Gallico and the Aeneid, with an eye to the nuances of language and the literary features of both works, including Latin metrics and figures of speech, as well as their cultural and political backgrounds. We begin with fairly moderate readings; as students improve in fluency and stamina, we work up to reading about 120 lines of Vergil in a week. The AP Exam is not required but a student who completes the course successfully will be prepared to take it.


Latin V

The course follows the College Board's former curriculum definition for the Latin Literature course, using Catullus and Horace. (Catullus was required, Horace was selected from a list of options.) It is hence an introduction to Latin Lyric, emphasizing both linguistic and literary properties of the work. We will discuss the artistic and metrical problems, issues of textual transmission, and interpretive scholarship. Note: This course follows the College Board's former AP Latin Literature Curriculum. There is no longer an exam offered in the field, but the lineup was a rich and rewarding one, and we will continue to provide it while there is demand for it. It provides very good background for intermediate to advanced level work in college Latin courses.


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Greek Courses for 2017-2018

Introduction to Greek

This course, together with Greek II, is a fairly complete exposure to Attic (classical) Greek using the thorough, if weighty, book by Hansen and Quinn. By the end of the two-year sequence, students are ready to tackle Attic authors, and in the past have tested into upper-division college-level courses in Greek. By the end of the first year, most students can make reasonably good progress through the Greek New Testament with little more assistance than a lexicon.

Greek III: (Intermediate Level) Readings in Greek History and Literature

Continuing on the basis of Greek I-II, we now branch out into the reading of a variety of materials from an intermediate Greek reader, and then progress through as much of Socrates' Apology as time allows. (In recent years, we have been able to complete the whole of the Apology.) The goal is to move from mastery of forms and constructions to a synthetic fluency in reading Greek.

Greek V

An introduction to Attic drama, based upon E. R. Dodds' very thorough student edition (with commentary) of Euripides' Bacchae. We will read the entire play through the year, and discuss its linguistic and artistic challenges, as well as the nature of text survivals from the ancient world.


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Literature Courses for 2017-2018

The Thought Plickens

This class is primarily for students in 6th-8th grade. The purpose of this class is to prepare students of a younger age group for the more intensive reading and critical thinking assignments of high school. It will introduce the students to novels that have a deeper subtext, that are applicable to transitioning into their teenage years and in some cases an awareness to social structures in the world at large. In addition to the aforementioned overarching concepts of the novel, there will be a focus on reading for details as well. Students are essentially being taught to be literary detectives - seeking out general plot themes and picking apart the minutiae of character, narrative and historical background.

World Literature

Focusing on the contents of a single anthology, this course attempts to expose students to the variety of literary genres and types around the world from the earliest times to the present day. We discuss a variety of topics, including the problems of translation, the nature of excerpts, the nature of the hero, the formation of an authorial voice, and genres such as lyric, drama, proverb, myth, and epic. We read three major plays entire, including Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare's The Tempest, and Ibsen's A Doll's House.

Western Literature to Dante

An extensive exposure to the literature of the ancient and mediaeval West, from Biblical materials through mediaeval epic and romance. The course engages the student in a large amount of reading, exploring the larger themes and issues involved with reading such material. This course has been taught since 1996, and has often been cited by graduating seniors as their favorite class in the literature sequence. It is occasionally complemented by a Western Literature to Dante II course, which covers much the same time period, but going through a completely different assortment of literary products. The real emphasis is on reading a large volume of material and getting comfortable with the alien and familiar in cultures separated from us by long stretches of time. It also serves as an introduction to classical literature for those who are interested in pursuing Greek and/or Latin seriously.

English Literature

This is an introductory survey of English literature from the earliest survivals to the twentieth century. We approach the literature historically, tracing the developments of themes, ideas, and techniques of writing, as well as looking at the long and fascinating history of the language itself. The course is built around a very solid textbook, England in Literature, part of the "America Reads" series from Scott, Foresman. I will supplement the readings along the way with several novels and plays, and some incidental smaller items to be made available online.

The course attempts to introduce the student as well to the idea of close reading of texts: whereas Western Literature to Dante focuses on extensive reading of a wide range of material, all of it in translation, English Literature is more intensive: it looks at a smaller body of material more closely. In part this is possible because we will be examining most of the texts as they were originally written, with only the occasional minor adjustments for spelling. The Old and Middle English materials (not normally accessible to high school students without considerable specialized language study) are given here in modern translations, but beginning in the Renaissance, texts are as originally written. Throughout the course we try to mold careful and analytical readers, responding to the literature with a discerning and charitable eye.

American Literature

American Literature is a survey of American literature from colonial times to the late twentieth century. Once again, we take a generally historical approach to the material, tracing the development of particular themes, ideas, and techniques of writing, and examining the kaleidoscopic interactions of the many strands of the American population and culture. We especially try to dig into issues of theme and symbolic language in the works of the great nineteenth-century masters Melville and Hawthorne. The course is built around a basic textbook, The United States in Literature, part of the "America Reads" series from Scott, Foresman. It is slightly less thorough than its companion volume England in Literature, which serves as the backbone for English Literature, but I have supplemented its readings quite extensively with outside readings. Please see the required texts and readings pages for particulars. Contact me about this if you are interested.

Senior English

This course attempts to fill some of the gaps left by the other courses in the sequence, and to revisit older authors and topics of particular importance, while helping to build a greater synthetic understanding of literary operations and theory, and a stronger proficiency in writing. Accordingly it includes some French classicism, the Russian novel, German proto-romanticism, and the English gothic as well as more Shakespeare, Greek tragedy, Hawthorne, Melville, and Austen. We will primarily read modern literature in the western tradition, with a few excursions into areas that seem too important to ignore - some of which are also specially noted as relevant in the College Board's AP materials.

The other point of this class is to address the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement English program, leading to the AP exam. Taking the AP Exam, however, is not required.

Note: The College Board has begun to audit all curricula offered with the AP label. Having examined their standards, I have decided not to pursue their approval: it seems clear to me that meeting their expectations would entail dumbing the course down considerably. We cannot call this course AP English, therefore, but its substance is basically unchanged from the days when we did. It has provided solid preparation for students intending to take the AP Exam.

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Mathematics Courses for 2017-2018

Algebra

Algebra I is the gateway course for college admissions. This course examines 1) the acquisition, analysis, and display of data (graphs and charts), 2) multiple representations of linear and quadratic relations, equations, inequalities, and functions, and 3) factoring and multiplying expressions. As time permits, we may examine 1) experimental and theoretical probability and 2) simple trigonometry. Throughout, careful reasoning and real understanding are encouraged and prized.

Geometry

In this course, you will develop a logical system of thought. You will examine the properties of geometric shapes, and make conclusions about them using your logical system. This course covers most of Euclidean Geometry and some modern Geometry using traditional western tools of compass and straightedge and eastern tools of paper folding (origami) and modern tools (Geometer Sketchpad). Analytic Geometry is included to reinforce previously learned Algebra skills. The early part of the course has the students investigating geometric phenomena and collecting conjectures about what they see. Later on the students prove the conjectures they have collected.

Topics may include: similar and congruent figures, angles, geometric proofs, conjectures, counter examples, if-then statements, inductive and deductive reasoning, valid and invalid reasoning, postulates and proof, coordinate geometry, transformational geometry, transformation matrices, special right triangles. Class sessions will take place using a virtual white board (WIZIQ). All class sessions are archived for review by the students or if the student is unable to attend for any reason. Students will need to register with WIZIQ prior to their first class session and will receive a secure invitation from the instructor to attend class sessions. Homework will be assigned and discussed during the class time. Only quizzes and tests will be sent to each student (as well as their parents) as both .docx & .pdf documents and returned to the instructor for evaluation. Students will have an opportunity to correct all assessments to show mastery. It is the responsibility of the parents to supervise their student while completing each assessment. The evaluations will be returned to both the student and parent.

Advanced Algebra with Trigonometry

As far as possible, students are allowed to investigate algebraic concepts and processes before being introduced to the formulas and symbolic representations. Topics for exploration will include: linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, rational, and irrational functions. You will expand your understanding of the number system to include complex numbers, and you will develop an understanding of the concepts of elementary trigonometry, elementary probability, and sequences and series. You also will learn to model real-world problems using these concepts. A graphing calculator will be required at this level and beyond.

Class sessions will take place using a virtual white board (WIZIQ). All class sessions are archived for review by the students or if the student is unable to attend for any reason. Students will need to register with WIZIQ prior to their first class session and will receive a secure invitation from the instructor to attend class sessions. Homework will be assigned and discussed during the class time. Only quizzes and tests will be sent to each student (as well as their parents) as both .docx & .pdf documents and returned to the instructor for evaluation. Students will have an opportunity to correct all assessments to show mastery. It is the responsibility of the parents to supervise their student while completing each assessment. The evaluations will be returned to both the student and parent.

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus, is the bridge course to Calculus. We will integrate rigorous real world mathematical scenarios with technology - Calculator and Dynamic Software. We will cement the concept that variables really vary. Beyond the traditional topics, we will be able to study concepts such as harmonic analysis of complex wave patterns and logistic functions for restricted populations growth. We will examine problems from multiple perspectives - graphical, tabular, functional, and situational. And we will revisit one of our tools from Geometry to assist us in our analysis of complex functions.

Class sessions will take place using a virtual white board (WIZIQ). All class sessions are archived for review by the students or if the student is unable to attend for any reason. Students will need to register with WIZIQ prior to their first class session and will receive a secure invitation from the instructor to attend class sessions. Homework will be assigned and discussed during the class time. Only quizzes and tests will be sent to each student (as well as their parents) as both .docx & .pdf documents and returned to the instructor for evaluation. Students will have an opportunity to correct all assessments to show mastery. It is the responsibility of the parents to supervise their student while completing each assessment. The evaluations will be returned to both the student and parent.

Calculus

The topics for this course include Limits, Derivatives, and Integrals (both Definite and Indefinite). We will explore tools and techniques for applying these concepts, such as the Derivatives of Products and Quotients, and the Chain Rule. We will also form connections with the physical world, both for understanding and also for application. We'll use computers and apps where appropriate. PLEASE NOTE: This course is under revision: textbook and computer software will be upgraded, with information available by late April. Contact instructor if more information is needed before then.

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Science Courses for 2017-2018

Natural Science 1

Natural Science is a unique two-year course for junior high and early high school students, designed to provide the background and skills in earth, life, and physical sciences necessary for success in intensive college-preparatory courses in the sciences, specifically Scholars Online's AP compliant courses in Biology, Chemistry, Physics 1 and Physics 2. The core concepts of modern science are presented in their social and historical context, rather than as abstract theories isolated from each other or their historical roots. In year one, we explore the basic principles underlying both the physical and life sciences, including concepts of matter, early theories of planetary astronomy, the classification of living things, the establishment of engineering principles, the beginning of modern physiology and anatomy, and the development of classical mechanics, as we move through the history of scientific ideas from the ancient world to the seventeenth century.

Students learn to apply and recognize the limitations and advantages of scientific methodology, experimental and observational methods, to use mathematical methods for data analysis, and to appreciate not only the interrelations between different areas of scientific knowledge, but how the methods of critical analysis of observations developed, and how social forces shaped modern science. The first year covers astronomy, biology, matter theory, engineering, and mathematics during ancient, medieval, and Renaissance periods.

This course is taught using the Scholars Online Chat software, which allows the teacher to embed graphics, mathematical equations, and movies in the chat session, with complete logging available for the entire year. Audio software is deliberately not used, as a means of enforcing students students to think clearly and write precisely. [Students with limited online bandwidth can also participate fully in the course.

Natural Science 2

Natural Science is a unique two-year course for junior high and early high school students, designed to provide the background and skills in earth, life, and physical sciences necessary for success in intensive college-preparatory courses in the sciences, specifically Scholars Online's AP compliant courses in Biology, Chemistry, Physics 1 and Physics 2. The core concepts of modern science are presented in their social and historical context, rather than as abstract theories isolated from each other or their historical roots. In year two, we explore the basic principles underlying both the physical and life sciences, including chemical reactions, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, relativity, nuclear physics, ecology, evolution and geology, cellular biology, and modern cosmology as we move through the history of scientific ideas from the seventeenth century to our own time.

Students learn to apply and recognize the limitations and advantages of scientific methodology, experimental and observational methods, to use mathematical methods for data analysis, and to appreciate not only the interrelations between different areas of scientific knowledge, but how the methods of critical analysis of observations developed, and how social forces shaped modern science. The second year covers the development of modern science since the Renaissance, including the development of chemistry, thermodynamics, genetics, quantum mechanics, relativity, information science, ecology and cosmology.

This course is taught using the Scholars Online Chat software, which allows the teacher to embed graphics, mathematical equations, and movies in the chat session, with complete logging available for the entire year. Audio software is deliberately not used, as a means of enforcing students students to think clearly and write precisely. [Students with limited online bandwidth can also participate fully in the course.

Astronomy

This course provides an introduction to the principles of modern astronomy, including basic constellation recognition, apparent motions of celestial objects, development of the Copernican model of the solar system, telescope optics, characteristics of solar system planets, stellar structure and life cycles, and current theories on the origin of the universe.

The instructor worked at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory during the Viking and Voyager missions, and has taught astronomy at the college level.

This course is taught using the Scholars Online Chat software, which allows the teacher to embed graphics, mathematical equations, and movies in the chat session, with complete logging available for the entire year. Audio software is not used to allow students with limited internet access to participate fully, and to encourage precise thinking and writing skills.

Honors/AP Biology

AP/Honors Biology builds on concepts of matter acquired in junior high or basic chemistry, covering more advanced concepts in, organic chemistry, the structure and components of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, cellular respiration and photosynthesis, genetics and heredity, evolution and speciation, comparative anatomy with an emphasis on human anatomy and physiology, plant structure, growth, and reproduction, and ecology. Students must complete five safety and skills checkout labs and 15 lab exercises to receive AP credit. Student who complete fewer labs than required for AP credit but satisfactorily complete all other work may receive honors credit for the course.

In 2013, the College Board revised requirements for the AP Biology course and exam preparation. This course has been updated and certified to meet or exceed all syllabus requirements, including lab work, for AP Biology. Students completing this course satisfactorily will be prepared to take the SAT II and/or AP Biology examinations

This course is taught using the Scholars Online Chat software, which allows the teacher to embed graphics, mathematical equations, and movies in the chat session, with complete logging available for the entire year. Audio software is not used to allow students with limited internet access to participate fully, and to encourage precise thinking and writing skills.

Honors/AP Chemistry

AP/Honors Chemistry builds on concepts of matter acquired in junior high or basic chemistry, covering more advanced concepts in atomic structure, electron configuration, the nature of chemical bonds, aspects of acid-base and precipitation reactions, simple solution preparation, chemical equilibria, ane energy. Additional topics may include organic chemistry, biochemistry, and the characteristics of chemical families, depending on student interest. Students must complete three safety checkout labs and 19 lab exercises to receive AP credit. Student who complete fewer labs than required for AP credit but satisfactorily complete all other work may receive honors credit for the course.

In 2014, the College Board revised requirements for the AP Chemistry course and exam preparation. This course has been updated and certified to meet or exceed all syllabus requirements, including lab work, for AP Chemistry. Students completing this course satisfactorily will be prepared to take the SAT II and/or AP Chemistry examinations.

This course is taught using the Scholars Online Chat software, which allows the teacher to embed graphics, mathematical equations, and movies in the chat session, with complete logging available for the entire year. Audio software is not used to allow students with limited internet access to participate fully, and to encourage precise thinking and writing skills.

Honors/AP Physics 1&2

Many students are unable to take two years to cover the AP curriculum for Physics 1 and 2 to gain a complete understanding of the principles required for college level work in physics, astronomy, or engineering. This course is a unique AP-approved opportunity for the dedicated student to complete survey courses in both classical mechanics and modern physics in a single year. Students learn the principles of classical mechanics, including basic concepts of motion, conservation laws, kinematics and dynamics, energy, momentum, and modern physics topics in thermodynamics, optics, electrical and magnetic fields, light wave mechanics, quantum mechanics, and nuclear energy.

In most schools, this course would normally be taught as a two-year sequence. Students attempting our Scholars Online intensive combination should be high motivated and self-disciplined, prepared to commit significantly more time than they would normally spend on a single course. Up to 15 hours per week may be required for chat preparation, quizzes, and lab work. Attendance at three weekly sessions is required for all students. Two sessions will cover textbook materials and homework assignments. The third session will cover lab work and specific preparation for the AP examination in May.

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History Courses for 2017-2018

World History to 1790

Year one of this two-year World History covers political, social, and economic developments in all parts of the world, beginning with the prehistorical development of tools and agriculture, and examining in turn the ancient cultures of Mesopotamia, India, and China before looking at the classical world of Greece and Rome, the rise of Islam and Byzantium, and pre-Columbian cultures in the Americas. Later chapters look at African kingdoms and cultures, the medieval dynasties of Japan and China, and the rise of Mongol tribes in Asia before returning to medieval and Renaissance Europe, the age of European exploration, and the establishment of absolute and constitutional monarchies.

Lectures and readings provide students with a solid grounding in the key names, dates, civilizations, and movements of world history, while seminar-type live chat discussions help students develop the tools of historiography and explore unifying thems on use of resources, the establishment of communities, and the expression of power across time periods and geographical boundaries.

Dr. Christe McMenomy and Dr. Bruce McMenomy provide different interpretations of key movements and events, helping students develop their own interpretations of history.

World History since 1790

Year two of this two-year World History continues the overview of political, social, and economic developments in all parts of the world, beginning with the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, then continuing with the colonization of Africa, the rise of the Ottoman Empire in Asia, the continuity of dynastic rule in China and the development of the shogunate order in Japan. Focus then shifts to the revolutions in America and Europe and the Industrial Revolution, the rapidly changing economics and power struggles of imperialism, and the struggle for national identity in the wake of World War I. Most of the later part of the course focusses on developments in the twentieth century, including the rise and fall of superpowers and the stuggle over globalization.

Lectures and readings provide students with a solid grounding in the key names, dates, civilizations, and movements of world history, while seminar-type live chat discussions help students develop the tools of historiography and explore unifying thems on use of resources, the establishment of communities, and the expression of power across time periods and geographical boundaries.

Dr. Christe McMenomy and Dr. Bruce McMenomy provide different interpretations of key movements and events, helping students develop their own interpretations of history.

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Modern Language Courses for 2017-2018

French 1

French 1 through live classes with Audio (Skype) and Chat: At the end of the first-year program, it is hoped that the student will have reached an A1 level as defined by the Council of Europe scale. This is a level of basic communication about the speakersÕ immediate concrete needs, his or her background, the world surrounding him or her, and everyday routines.

The program focuses on communication skills, grammar, vocabulary, and culture. The grammar allows for formation of simple sentences and questions in the present and in the past. The vocabulary includes words necessary for everyday life such as the family, school, shopping, numbers, etc. The cultures of the French-speaking world are also presented with topics such as greetings, the cafˇ, the French family, sports and leisure, friendship, travel in France, and many more. All areas of communication, speaking, listening, reading, and writing are practiced.

The material is presented through a textbook which uses real French documents and media. Ample audio and visual material is provided in the integrated multimedia Supersite. Students do exercises in an online workbook which allows the teacher to give immediate feedback. Students are expected to spend at least thirty minutes to one hour a day studying at home. The most important part of the class, however, is the two weekly hours of online class time, where students put what they are learning into practice and gain confidence in their communication skills. We use Skype for the audio component of our class.

French 2

French 2 with live Audio (Skype) and Chat classes: The second-year program adds to the studentsÕ ability to express complex ideas and reasoning. It is hoped that they will reach a A2 level according to the Council of Europe scale. At this level, students should understand the main points of clear conversations and should be able to manage most situations while traveling. In addition, they should be able to speak simply about their personal interests as well as events, plans, and dreams. All four areas of expression, reading, writing, listening, and speaking are practiced.

The material is presented through a textbook which uses real French documents and media. Ample audio and visual material is provided on the integrated multimedia Supersite. Students do exercises in an online workbook which allows the teacher to give immediate feedback. The most important part of the class, however, is the two weekly hours of online class time, where students put what they are learning into practice and gain confidence in their communication skills. We use the program Skype for the audio component of our class.

French 3

French 3 with live Audio (Skype) and Chat classes: French 3 will focus on more complex structures in syntax and grammar. The students will enhance their vocabulary for speaking about everyday life in French. The goal is for student to reach a B1 level according to the Council of Europe's language standards. The class will follow a multimedia format, where students have access to audio, video and documents from native French speakers. We will use the chatroom from Scholars Online and an internet-calling program like Skype.

Old English

A fairly rigorous introduction to the language and literature of Anglo-Saxon England. This will be a demanding course, covering in a year about what a one-semester college course would cover. We will cover the fundamentals of Old English morphology and syntax, and read an assortment of works, including prose histories, sermons, and poetry including "The Wanderer" and "The Seafarer", and segments of Beowulf.

This course is offered intermittently.


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Philosophy Courses for 2017-2018

Formal Logic

This course introduces formal logic, which is the study of arguments in terms of their deductive validity. The course begins with a discussion of what arguments are and how an argument's deductive validity is based on its form. Next artificial languages of increasing complexity are introduced and it is shown that these languages can help to illuminate the concept of deductive validity in English.

Reasoning

This course introduces the discipline of philosophy through examination of logical reasoning. Like many common activities, reasoning raises philosophical questions. The course begins by reviewing the difference between valid and invalid deductive arguments. The bulk of the course looks at examples of reasoning in the fields of practical reasoning and ethics, progressing to law, politics, and theology. Usually we analyze the reasoning in a recent United States Supreme Court opinion. Some common themes emerge. In every field, reasoning cannot begin unless certain fundamental premises are accepted. How do philosophers approach the question of how to choose among competing interests and desires? Why is murder wrong? Can we prove any of the truths of Christianity from reason alone? Towards the middle and end of the course, students will prepare papers analyzing instances of sophisticated reasoning chosen by the instructor.

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Programming Courses for 2017-2018

Introduction to Programming

Participants in this course will learn:

  • What is programming?
  • ow to design a program
  • The analysis and reasoning needed to convert a statement of requirements into a program design.
  • Some basic flowcharting techniques.
  • The basics of the Clojure programming language. Each student will prepare a final project analyzing and designing a program.

Students should be familiar with text editors and working with files and folders (directories) on their computers. It is highly recommended that students complete their coursework on a computer, not a mobile device; but if they are using only a mobile device, they should have a keyboard available.

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Composition and Grammar Courses for 2017-2018

Cursus Scriptorum

The Cursus Scriptorum is the new Scholars Online writing program: designed to be as rigorous and comprehensive as possible, following an innovative individualized process, and taking the form of an academic game. The course is asynchronous, to allow students to proceed at their own pace and to allow those with crowded schedules to enroll. Teachers will be available online in "office hours" for immediate feedback if desired, but these sessions will be set up after the beginning of the year. See the course page above for more information.

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Middle School

Click here for a complete list of 2017-2018 courses and their descriptions

Use our Classical Education Curriculum Page to identify courses at the right level for your student in each subject for Fall 2017, or to plan your entire Junior High - Senior High program.

While our live chat courses are the best value, if you prefer individualized instruction, we can also arrange tutorials for many courses (tutorial fees are set by the instructor at a per-hour charge).


Enrolling in Courses

Existing Adult Members: Log into your Scholars Online account to enroll your students or yourself in our courses.

New to Scholars Online? Create Your Account now to become a member and explore our Moodle environment to get ready for next year's courses.

Questions? We're busy teaching, but you can email us at admin@scholarsonline.org. Let us know if you prefer a phone call, and the best times to reach you.


DISTRESSING REPORTS OF ANNOYING CALLS

Scholars Online has been notified by several different people that they were called by someone claiming to be from Scholars Online and subjected to intrusive questions and even threats. We have no idea who is behind this, but rest assured that Scholars Online is not responsible. If anyone calls you, claiming to be from us, and is in the least annoying or intrusive, feel free to hang up. If you are uncertain, you can ask the caller, "what does e pluribus unum mean?" or "who was crowned Emperor of the Romans in 800 A.D.?" or "what is the square root of negative one?" Anyone from Scholars Online will know the answers.

More seriously: if you get a phone number from the caller, please email us with that information, so that we can collect evidence of the impersonation. You should also report the call(s) to the Federal Trade Commission. Use the Scams and Ripoffs > Impersonator Scams option, and enter the circumstances of the call and any contact information the user gave you.

Scholars Online does no telemarketing. We only contact by phone those family members or prospective members who have explicitly requested phone calls rather than email exchanges. We do not ever require payment or request any personal financial information in a phone call. Please do not give any personal or any financial information over the phone to anyone who calls you, unless you requested the call and know the caller.


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Join the Scholars Online Facebook group and check out our Facebook page.

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Scholars Online is currently engaged in accreditation evaluation by MSA-CESS for the 2017-2018 academic year. Courses taken from Fall 2009 - Spring 2017 were fully accredited by AdvancED and NWAC. For more information on accreditation, see our Scholars Online Accreditation page.