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Scholars Online Course Catalog for 2022

Below is a list with descriptions of our current courses. Click on the course title for full details, including pre-requisites, textbooks, and links to individual course websites. You may find this useful to download and study when you are selecting courses.

For a summary list, check out the Scholars Online Course List for 2022.

To enroll in the courses below, create a member account (see Becoming a Member), then log in and use the menu from your secure account to create student accounts and enroll students in courses.

Summer Term courses for 2022

History
Around the World in Nine WeeksAroundTheWorld.jpgDuring our first session, we'll explore the nature of geography and its branches — physical, social, environmental, and regional, and the disciplines of mapmaking and chartmaking to display information tied to locations. During the following seven weeks, using short videos, animations, and live chat discussions, we will look at major regions of the world, focusing on physical geography. In our final session, you will present reports on a region or country that you find particularly fascinating. Be better prepared to understand historical information, literary references, and current events!1: C. McMenomy
We 9:30 AM-10:50 AM
$225.00
Literature
Looking at Middle-earthMEReduced.gifBased on the books, not the movies, this course considers many facets of J. R. R. Tolkien’s mythic creation, especially as embodied in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. (Acquaintance with The Silmarillion or the multi-volume History of Middle-earth won’t go amiss, but is not required.) In a fairly free and un-pressured context, we look at Tolkien’s world-building, his use of language, his theology of “subcreation”, and certain facets of his life and professional work as a philologist that have a bearing on the vision he created. I’ve been a fan of Tolkien’s works since I was thirteen, and never tire of sharing them with a new generation.1: B. McMenomy
Tu 1:00 PM-2:30 PM
$250.00
Summer Shakespeare IISummerShake2.jpgA second summer full of Shakespeare — we go through ten of the Bard's lesser-known plays, touching comedy, tragedy, history, and romance: Comedy:
* Love’s Labour’s Lost
* The Comedy of Errors
* The Merry Wives of Windsor
* All’s Well That Ends Well Tragedy:
* Antony and Cleopatra
* Coriolanus History:
* Henry VI, Parts 1, 2, and 3 Romance:
* The Winter’s Tale
1: B. McMenomy
We 1:00 PM-3:00 PM
$275.00
Programming
HTML BasicsHTMLBasics.jpgThis course covers the basic elements of HTML5 (the current standard hypertext markup language) used in webpage production, with an emphasis on the fundamentals of web page mechanics and design. In a series of live chat sessions, students will copy and implement the techniques demonstrated and perform hands-on exercises to learn how HTML tags control page layout, fonts, links, lists, and tables. Students will create simple forms to collect information from the site user, and configure cascading style sheets to change the look and feel of their websites. We will also discuss site design and readability, and explore internet resources to continue development of basic skills.1: C. McMenomy
We 1:00 PM-2:30 PM
$225.00
Introduction to Programming with ScratchScratch.jpgLearn the elements of basic programming using the innovative SCRATCH programming platform developed by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab. During chats, you will assemble pre-compiled code blocks rather than typing code, allowing you to focus on developing conceptual programming skills that can be applied to any advanced programming language. As we guide you step-by-step and show you how to use the different functions of Scratch in "real time", you will be able to create executable animation programs from the very first session. Over the eight week course, you will learn, program, and execute the fundamental programming constructions, including function calls, if-then-else logic, and iteration loops. You will be able to share the animations and games you create with your teacher and classmates and gain recognition for your work on the MIT SCRATCH platform.1: C. McMenomy
We 11:00 AM-12:30 PM
$225.00
Science
The Chemical History of the CandleCandle.jpgWe will use the lectures Michael Faraday delivered in 1861 as a starting point to discuss scientific methods and experimentation, chemical composition of wax, combustion reactions, forces and energy, and the history of the human scientific endeavor. Faraday is still regarded as one of the greatest experimental scientists of all time, and his lectures are filled with his excitement over the wonders of natural phenomena, as well as detailed observations on the behavior of elements like hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, and practical demonstrations of experimental observational methods.
All students will perform several of Faraday's experiments (adapted for safety and easy home performance) so they can develop proper experimental techniques. Then we will write up our results and discuss them. This is an excellent opportunity for junior high and early high school students to prepare for high school level science courses.
1: C. McMenomy
Tu 11:00 AM-12:30 PM
$225.00
Writing
How to Become a Precocious StudentPrecociousStudent.jpgLearn the study methods of master students! Students often struggle with basic study skills, superficially passing over material in an effort to finish assigned tasks and check them off, but not really understanding or retaining what they are learning. In this eight-week course, we'll look at critical study skills every student needs, including how to make friends with your textbook, decipher graphical information, memorize important facts, and manage time for both short term and long term projects. We'll also talk about the importance of concentration and contemplation in mastering complex material. Because this course benefits the teachers as well as the student, students completing this summer course will receive $50 credit toward one academic year 2022-2023 course they enroll in. Credits may not be transferred to another student.1: C. McMenomy and B. McMenomy
Th 1:00 PM-2:30 PM
$200.00
Molding Your ProseMYP.jpgThis course fosters familiarity with the writing process by asking the student to write a sequence of exercises based on the same basic narrative material. Along the way, students learn that written material does not steer itself: it can be adapted almost infinitely to a variety of forms and requirements. In this respect, it is an introduction to both other writing courses and to literary study.1: B. McMenomy
Tu 11:00 AM-12:30 PM
$250.00
Writing the Research PaperResearchPaper.jpgStudents will develop a disciplined approach to writing the research paper: a sustained activity requiring imagination, introspection, research, organization, and of course, writing! We will learn how to identify an appropriate topic, perform initial research to refine the topic, carry out more detailed research and take notes, organize our results, outline and draft the formal paper using one of several common formats, create a bibliography, proofread, and present our final version. 1: C. McMenomy
Tu 9:30 AM-10:50 AM
$225.00

Academic Year courses for Fall 2022 - Spring 2023

Greek
Greek IIIGreek3.jpgContinuing on the basis of Greek I-II, we now branch out into the reading of a variety of materials from an intermediate Greek reader, and then progress through as much of Socrates' Apology as time allows. (In recent years, we have been able to complete the whole of the Apology.) The goal is to move from mastery of forms and constructions to a synthetic fluency in reading Greek.1: B. McMenomy
Mo 4:00 PM-5:30 PM • We 4:00 PM-5:30 PM
$700.00
Latin
Latin IIILatin3.jpgUsing the long-established and brilliantly annotated collection From Aeneas to Augustus, this course offers a range of engaging readings on the history of Rome from its foundation down to the end of the Republic. Students will find old favorite stories and discover new ones — from semi-mythical narratives like the story of Horatius at the bridge to wry personal letters of Cicero. Throughout we’ll be systematically reviewing both the grammatical basics that were covered in the elementary Latin sequence and building a framework for understanding Roman history, all of which will continue to be useful in understanding the material of Latin IV.1: B. McMenomy
Tu 4:00 PM-5:30 PM • Th 4:00 PM-5:30 PM
$700.00
Latin IV (Caesar and Vergil)Latin4.jpgThis course lets students confront continuous Latin writings in their original form — extensive prose passages from Caesar’s stirring (and sometimes disturbing) De Bello Gallico and the unsurpassed poetry of Vergil’s Aeneid. We deal with the technical issues of the Latin language, but also with its subtler nuances and the literary features of both works, taken together with their cultural and political contexts. We begin with fairly moderate readings; as students improve in fluency and stamina, they work up to reading about 120 lines of Vergil a week.

The course follows the College Board’s 2012 revised curriculum for AP Latin (Caesar and Vergil). It cannot be called AP Latin, since I am not seeking official approval from the College Board, but our students routinely go on to take the exam and to do well in it. Taking the AP Exam is not required but a student who completes the course successfully should be well prepared for it.
1: B. McMenomy
Mo 11:00 AM-12:30 PM • Th 11:00 AM-12:30 PM
$700.00
Literature
Western Literature to DanteWLit2Dante.jpgAn extensive exposure to the literature of ancient and mediaeval times, from scripture through mediaeval epic and romance, this tough but engaging course is unlike any other you are likely to find. It requires a large amount of reading, while exploring its themes and problems at a fairly high level, weighing what is alien and what is familiar to us in cultures separated from us by long stretches of history. It also serves as an introduction to classical literature for those who want to pursue Greek and/or Latin seriously beyond the mere rudiments of the language. It has also been taken on several occasions by adults, who are more than welcome to participate if they behave themselves.

Taught continuously since 1996, this course has often been cited by graduating seniors as their favorite class in the literature sequence; many of them have continued to study classics or mediaeval literature in college. It is occasionally supplemented by a Western Literature to Dante II course, which covers (mostly) the same time period, but goes through a completely different body of literature.
1: B. McMenomy
Mo 1:00 PM-2:30 PM
$550.00
English LiteratureEnglishLit.jpgWe survey English literature historically from the earliest survivals to the twentieth century, tracing the development of themes, ideas, and techniques of writing, as well as looking at the long and fascinating history of the language itself.

The course is built around a very solid textbook, England in Literature, part of the “America Reads” series from Scott, Foresman. It is unfortunately out of print, but copies remain available. We supplement the readings with a couple of Shakespeare plays and a few novels, and some incidental smaller items made available online.

From a pedagogical point of view, the course introduces the idea of close reading of texts: whereas Western Literature to Dante focuses on extensive reading of a wide range of material, all of it in translation, English Literature is more intensive: it looks at a smaller body of material more closely. In part this is possible because we will be examining most of the texts as they were originally written, with only the occasional minor adjustments for spelling. The Old and Middle English materials (not normally accessible to high school students without considerable specialized language study) are given here in modern translations, but beginning in the Renaissance, texts are as originally written. Throughout the course we try to mold careful and analytical readers, responding to the literature with a discerning and charitable eye. Students especially intrigued by the older forms of English are welcome to take Old English when we offer it.
1: B. McMenomy
We 11:00 AM-12:30 PM
$550.00
American LiteratureAmLit.jpgThis course examines the rich, varied, and occasionally quirky textures of American literature from colonial times to the late twentieth century. Once again, we take a generally historical approach to the material, tracing the development of particular themes, ideas, and techniques of writing, and examining the kaleidoscopic interactions of the many strands of the American population and culture.

While Western Literature to Dante emphasized extensive reading and English Literature focused on intensive reading, this course puts the two together. We read for the long view and zoom in on occasion for close scrutiny where it is warranted. In the process, we dig into issues of theme and symbolic language in the works of the great nineteenth-century masters Melville and Hawthorne, and the evolution of different approaches to realism in its various guises. We also spend some time examining modern critical writing. Those who plan to go on to take literature courses in college are well advised to be at least forewarned about some of the directions critical thought has taken.

The textbook for the course is The United States in Literature, which, like England in Literature, is part of the “America Reads” series from Scott, Foresman. The series has long since gone out of print, and nothing nearly as good has emerged to replace it, but happily used copies are still available and circulating fairly freely. A number of novels and plays take their place alongside the course textbook.
1: B. McMenomy
We 1:00 PM-2:30 PM
$550.00
Senior English (Literature)SrEnglish.jpgThis is possibly the toughest course you will ever take. So people tell me after college. It’s not hard to pass; it’s just a lot of continuous and serious work, including a huge amount of writing — thirty papers, give or take one or two. I grade those brutally and then scale the results generously. Overall, my plan is to stretch your capacities and challenge your assumptions. The class is partly a composition course, partly a course in literary theory, partly an exploration of propositional logic, and a little left over that’s pure fun.

In terms of content, the course fills some of the gaps left by the other courses in the literature sequence, and to revisit older authors and topics of particular importance, while helping to build a greater synthetic understanding of literary operations and theory, and a stronger proficiency in writing. Accordingly it includes some French classicism, the Russian novel, early German romanticism, and the English gothic as well as more Shakespeare, Greek tragedy, Hawthorne, Melville, and Austen.

We primarily read modern literature in the western tradition, with a few excursions into areas that seem too important to ignore — some of which are also specially noted as relevant in the College Board's AP materials, since the other point of this class is to address the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement English program, leading to the AP exam. It is not an officially approved AP course; meeting the College Board’s qualifications would, I am persuaded, require me to dumb the course down. Taking the AP Exam is not required.
1: B. McMenomy
Tu 1:00 PM-2:30 PM • Th 1:00 PM-2:30 PM
$850.00
Mathematics
GeometryGeometry.jpgIn this course, you will develop a logical system of thought. You will examine the properties of geometric shapes, and make conclusions about them using your logical system. This course covers most of Euclidean Geometry and some modern Geometry using traditional western tools of compass and straightedge and eastern tools of paper folding (origami) and modern tools (Geometer Sketchpad). Analytic Geometry is included to reinforce previously learned Algebra skills. The early part of the course has the students investigating geometric phenomena and collecting conjectures about what they see. Later on the students prove the conjectures they have collected. Topics may include: similar and congruent figures, angles, geometric proofs, conjectures, counter examples, if-then statements, inductive and deductive reasoning, valid and invalid reasoning, postulates and proof, coordinate geometry, transformational geometry, transformation matrices, special right triangles. Class sessions will take place using a virtual white board over ZOOM. All class sessions are archived for review by the students or if the student is unable to attend for any reason. Students will receive a secure invitation from the instructor to attend class sessions. The student will be able to download a set of Guided Notes from the Moodle for each chapter. These will assist our work together and help to make connections between the readings, the class discussions and the homework. Homework will be assigned and discussed during class time. ALL quizzes and tests will be posted on the Moodle and will be available to be downloaded by the student when the student and their parent are both notified by email. They are to be competed and returned to the instructor for evaluation. Students will have an opportunity to correct all assessments to show mastery. It is the responsibility of the parents to supervise their student while completing each assessment. The evaluations will be returned to both the student and parent. Progress reports will be sent out to the student and parent on a regular basis. 1: A. Mabbott
Mo 11:00 AM-12:00 PM • We 11:00 AM-12:00 PM • Fr 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
$500.00
Algebra 2 (Advanced Algebra)AdvAlgebra.jpgAs far as possible, students are allowed to investigate algebraic concepts and processes before being introduced to the formulas and symbolic representations. Topics for exploration will include: linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, rational, and irrational functions. You will expand your understanding of the number system to include complex numbers, and you will develop an understanding of the concepts of elementary trigonometry, elementary probability, and sequences and series. You also will learn to model real-world problems using these concepts. A graphing calculator will be required at this level and beyond. Class sessions will take place using a virtual white board over ZOOM. All class sessions are archived for review by the students or if the student is unable to attend for any reason. Students will receive a secure invitation from the instructor to attend class sessions. The student will be able to download a set of Guided Notes from the Moodle for each chapter. These will assist our work together and help to make connections between the readings, the class discussions and the homework. Homework will be assigned and discussed during class time. ALL quizzes and tests will be posted on the Moodle and will be available to be downloaded by the student when the student and their parent are both notified by email. They are to be competed and returned to the instructor for evaluation. Students will have an opportunity to correct all assessments to show mastery. It is the responsibility of the parents to supervise their student while completing each assessment. The evaluations will be returned to both the student and parent. Progress reports will be sent out to the student and parent on a regular basis. 1: A. Mabbott
Mo 1:00 PM-2:00 PM • We 1:00 PM-2:00 PM • Fr 1:00 PM-2:00 PM
$500.00
Pre-Calculus with TrigonometryPreCalcTrig.jpg Pre-Calculus, is the bridge course to Calculus. We will integrate rigorous real world mathematical scenarios with technology - Calculator and Dynamic Software. We will cement the concept that variables really vary. Beyond the traditional topics, we will be able to study concepts such as harmonic analysis of complex wave patterns and logistic functions for restricted populations growth. We will examine problems from multiple perspectives - graphical, tabular, functional, and situational. And we will revisit one of our tools from Geometry to assist us in our analysis of complex functions. Class sessions will take place using a virtual white board over ZOOM. All class sessions are archived for review by the students or if the student is unable to attend for any reason. Students will receive a secure invitation from the instructor to attend class sessions. The student will be able to download a set of Guided Notes from the Moodle for each chapter. These will assist our work together and help to make connections between the readings, the class discussions and the homework. Homework will be assigned and discussed during class time. ALL quizzes and tests will be posted on the Moodle and will be available to be downloaded by the student when the student and their parent are both notified by email. They are to be competed and returned to the instructor for evaluation. Students will have an opportunity to correct all assessments to show mastery. It is the responsibility of the parents to supervise their student while completing each assessment. The evaluations will be returned to both the student and parent. Progress reports will be sent out to the student and parent on a regular basis. 1: A. Mabbott
Mo 3:00 PM-4:00 PM • We 3:00 PM-4:00 PM • Fr 3:00 PM-4:00 PM
$500.00
Philosophy
ReasoningReasoning.jpgThis course introduces the discipline of philosophy through examination of logical reasoning. Like many common activities, reasoning raises philosophical questions. The course begins by discussing the difference between valid and invalid deductive arguments as reflected in elementary logic. The bulk of the course looks at examples of reasoning in the fields of practical reasoning and ethics, progressing to law, politics, and theology. Usually we analyze the reasoning in a recent United States Supreme Court opinion. Some common themes emerge. In every field, reasoning cannot begin unless certain fundamental premises are accepted. How do philosophers approach the question of how to choose among competing interests and desires? What is distinctive about scientific reasoning? Why is murder wrong? What premises and forms of argument are used in legal reasoning? Can we discern theological reasoning in the books of the Bible? Towards the middle and end of the course, students will prepare papers analyzing instances of sophisticated reasoning chosen by the instructor. 1: K. Oles
Fr 12:00 PM-1:00 PM
$500.00
Science
Natural Science INaturalScience.jpgNatural Science is a unique two-year course for junior high and early high school students, designed to provide the background and skills in earth, life, and physical sciences necessary for success in intensive college-preparatory courses in the sciences, specifically Scholars Online's Honors and AP compliant courses in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Astronomy. Adults wishing to gain a new perspective on science or refresh their understanding of key concepts are also welcome to take the course. Using a wide range of internet readings, simulations, and videos, we explore the core concepts of modern science in their social and historical contexts, rather than as abstract theories isolated from each other or their historical roots. Discover the basic principles underlying both the physical and life sciences, including matter theory, motion and force, energy, electricity and magnetism, classification of living things, ecology, evolution, and cellular biology, see how these apply to the sciences of geology, meteorology, astronomy, oceanography, zoology and botany, and learn how some theories were readily accepted while others were challenged for both scientific and social reasons as we move through the history of scientific ideas from the ancient world to our own time. Learn to apply and recognize the limitations and advantages of scientific methodology, experimental and observational methods, to use mathematical methods for data analysis, and to appreciate not only the interrelations between different areas of scientific knowledge, but how the methods of critical analysis of observations developed, and how social forces shaped modern science. The first year covers astronomy, biology, matter theory, engineering, and mathematics during ancient, medieval, and Renaissance periods. For more information on how this course fits into the Scholars Online Science Curriculum, please read the Science Curricum Design page. This course is taught using the Scholars Online Chat software, which allows the teacher to embed graphics, mathematical equations, and movies in the chat session, with complete logging available for the entire year. Audio software is deliberately not used, as a means of enforcing students students to think clearly and write precisely. [Students with limited online bandwidth can also participate fully in the course.] 1: C. McMenomy
Fr 11:00 AM-12:30 PM
$500.00
Natural Science IINaturalScience2.jpgNatural Science is a unique two-year course for junior high and early high school students, designed to provide the background and skills in earth, life, and physical sciences necessary for success in intensive college-preparatory courses in the sciences, specifically Scholars Online's courses in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Astronomy. Adults wishing to gain a new perspective on science or refresh their understanding of key concepts are also welcome to take the course. Using a wide range of internet readings, simulations, and videos, we explore the core concepts of modern science in their social and historical contexts, rather than as abstract theories isolated from each other or their historical roots. Discover the basic principles underlying both the physical and life sciences, including matter theory, motion and force, energy, electricity and magnetism, classification of living things, ecology, evolution, and cellular biology, see how these apply to the sciences of geology, meteorology, astronomy, oceanography, zoology and botany, and learn how some theories were readily accepted while others were challenged for both scientific and social reasons as we move through the history of scientific ideas from the ancient world to our own time. Learn to apply and recognize the limitations and advantages of scientific methodology, experimental and observational methods, to use mathematical methods for data analysis, and to appreciate not only the interrelations between different areas of scientific knowledge, but how the methods of critical analysis of observations developed, and how social forces shaped modern science. The second year covers the development of modern science since the Renaissance, including the development of chemistry, thermodynamics, genetics, quantum mechanics, relativity, information science, ecology and cosmology. . For more information on how this course fits into the Scholars Online Science Curriculum, please read the Science Curricum Design page. This course is taught using the Scholars Online Chat software, which allows the teacher to embed graphics, mathematical equations, and movies in the chat session, with complete logging available for the entire year. Audio software is deliberately not used, as a means of enforcing students students to think clearly and write precisely. [Students with limited online bandwidth can also participate fully in the course.] 1: C. McMenomy
TBD with enrolled students.
$500.00
BiologyBiology.jpgBiology builds on concepts of matter and living organisms acquired in junior high or basic chemistry. Working from the simplest living materials to complex systems, students learn how organic molecules and simple metabolic reactions form the components of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, use energy for the processes of cellular respiration and photosynthesis, and promote the transmission of genetic information from one cell generation to the next. We'll look at how modern biologists apply their implications and conclusions to explain the unity and diversity of life, and discuss the evidence and issues surrounding evolution theory. During the spring semester, we will investigate the anatomy and physiology of animals with an emphasis on the human body and current health issues, then look at similar structures and processes within plants. Our final unit synthesizes field observations to help us understand how individual organisms function and interact as parts of complex environmental systems. REQUIRED LAB WORK: Students must complete twelve basic biology labs for course credit. This course is taught using the Scholars Online Chat software, which allows the teacher to embed graphics, mathematical equations, and movies in the chat session, with complete logging available for the entire year. Video software is not used to allow students with limited internet access to participate fully, and to encourage reflection, precise thinking, and careful writing skills.1: C. McMenomy
Tu 11:00 AM-12:30 PM • Th 11:00 AM-12:30 PM
$700.00
AstronomyAstronomy.jpgWe'll study the principles of modern astronomy, including basic constellation recognition, apparent motions of celestial objects, development of the Copernican model of the solar system, telescope optics, characteristics of solar system planets, stellar structure and life cycles, and current theories on the origin of the universe. Learn how to navigate by the stars, why planets stay in orbit around the sun, what causes a supernova, and what modern astronomers think happened in the first three seconds of the universe! This course is taught using the Scholars Online Chat software, which allows the teacher to embed graphics, mathematical equations, and movies in the chat session, with complete logging available for the entire year. Audio software is not used to allow students with limited internet access to participate fully, and to encourage precise thinking and writing skills.1: C. McMenomy
Tu 1:00 PM-2:30 PM
$500.00
ChemistryChemistry.jpgChemistry builds on concepts of matter and chemical reactions acquired in junior high or basic chemistry by introducing more advanced methods of chemical analysis and more detailed models of atomic structure, electron configurations, and chemical bonds. Using these tools, we explore aspects of acid-base and precipitation reactions, simple solution preparation, chemical equilibria, and energy. We then look at the factors affection reaction rates, especially for reactions in solutions and electric cells. Additional topics may include environmental chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, and the characteristics of chemical families, depending on student interest. REQUIRED LAB WORK: Students must complete three safety checkout labs, then design, plan, and carry out nine labs (total 12 labs) for course credit. This course is taught using the Scholars Online Chat software, which allows the teacher to embed graphics, mathematical equations, and movies in the chat session, with complete logging available for the entire year. Audio software is not used to allow students with limited internet access to participate fully, and to encourage precise thinking and writing skills.1: C. McMenomy
Mo 11:00 AM-12:30 PM • We 11:00 AM-12:30 PM
$700.00
PhysicsPhysics.jpgPhysics builds on concepts of matter, force, and energy acquired in junior high by introducing more advanced methods of mathematical, dimensional, and graphical analysis to explore the fundamentals of classical mechanics: force, energy, and momentum, and uses these to show how energy and momentum are conserved in linear, circular, and rotational motion, as well as systems in equilibrium. During spring semester, we will use similar tools and methods to explore electricity, magnetism, optics, relativity, quantum mechanics, and nuclear physics. REQUIRED LAB WORK: Students must design, plan, and carry out twelve labs for course credit. This course is taught using the Scholars Online Chat software, which allows the teacher to embed graphics, mathematical equations, and movies in the chat session, with complete logging available for the entire year. Audio software is not used to allow students with limited internet access to participate fully, and to encourage precise thinking and writing skills.1: C. McMenomy
Mo 1:00 PM-2:30 PM • We 1:00 PM-2:30 PM
$700.00

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